Mouse Gestures For Mac

Posted : admin On 1/31/2022

Thirty years ago, Apple brought the mouse the masses. Now, the multitouch interface replaces the mouse with your fingers.

  1. Mouse Gestures For Mac Os
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  3. Mouse Gestures Windows 10

Use one or more fingers on the surface of your mouse to click, tap, slide, or swipe items. For example, to move between pages of a document, swipe left or right with one finger. To see all of the mouse gestures you can use with your Mac, or to turn off or customize gestures, choose Apple menu System Preferences, then click Mouse.

Nov 08, 2016 Hello, I was reading the synergy change log i saw this in 1.4.10 - Feature #2974 - Gesture Support for Magic Mouse/Trackpad Is this a current feature to use a multi-touch trackpad on an OS X Synergy server and gestures are sent to the OS X Synergy client i've never had anything more than simple mouse function. Hot Keys: Gestures allows user to associate key combinations such as F7 or cmd-control 'A' etc. To perform an action regardless of the current application. Mouse Gestures: by moving the mouse to create a predefined shape (users can also create their own custom gestures) an action can be performed without having to remove your hand from your mouse. Aug 27, 2020 There you can turn a gesture off, change the type of gesture, and learn which gestures work with your Mac. Mouse gestures require a Magic Mouse. Secondary click (right-click) Click the right side of the mouse. Scroll Slide one finger up or down to scroll. Smart zoom Double-tap with one finger to zoom in and back out of a webpage or PDF.

There’s nothing quite like reaching out and touching something. Why should your computer be any different? Between the iPhone, iPad and the 80% of Macs that are laptops, less than 3% of today’s Apple devices come with a mouse. Although you can still use a mouse with a Mac, modern Mac software is optimized for a trackpad. Apple is leaving the mouse behind. And you can, too – with a little practice.

Adjust your trackpad & mouse options in System Preferences, which you’ll find in the Apple menu. Practice them – you’ll use them every day. Click the Apple menu and choose System Preferences, then click Trackpad or Mouse. You’ll see the same short video clips demonstrating each gesture and you can customize them yourself.

Basic trackpad gestures to get you started

  • Swipe with one finger to move the pointer on the screen.
  • Click with one finger for regular selections, or double-tap to open a file.
  • Tap with two fingers to bring up options for the object you selected (correct spellings, definitions, colors, etc.).
  • Swipe with two fingers to scroll up or down. The area under the pointer moves the same direction as your fingers.
  • Pinch two fingers together to zoom out; move them apart to zoom in.
  • Rotate two fingers to turn a picture in Photos.

Advanced trackpad gestures

  • Tap with three fingers to look up a word in the dictionary.
  • Double-tap with two fingers for smart zoom. The text block under the pointer is enlarged to fill the screen.
  • Swipe left or right with two fingers to go back or forward. This applies on web pages, in iPhoto and many other apps.
  • Swipe left or right with three fingers to move between full-screen apps.
  • Swipe up with three fingers for Mission Control to see all your open windows at once.
  • Swipe down with three fingers to see just the current app's windows.
  • Flick four fingers apart to move windows out of the way and reveal the desktop.
  • Draw four fingers together for the Launchpad.

Apple uses “natural scrolling.” When you swipe your finger up, text moves up; swipe down and it goes down. Makes sense, right? Actually it’s the opposite of scrolling on old-style mice. It takes a bit to get used to but after a while it’s much more intuitive.

Force Click gestures

Many Apple laptops made in 2015 or later have a new kind of trackpad. It senses the amount of pressure you apply to the surface and determines whether you’re dragging, clicking, or performing a new function: Force Click. When you point to an object on the screen and press harder, it’s like right-clicking (or control-clicking). So point to a file or website link, press hard and you’ll see a preview of it… without leaving where you are. Force-click on a word to see a definition. Force-click on a date to add an event to your calendar. Force Click is only available on newer trackpads, and the Magic Trackpad 2. Learn more about Force Click.

Magic Mouse

While trackpads and a touch interface are certainly the future, a mouse still has its place. Here’s how to make the most of the Apple Magic Mouse.

  • Move the mouse on the desktop to move the pointer on the screen.
  • Click on the left half for regular selections, or double-click to open a file.
  • Click on the right half to bring up options for the object you selected (correct spellings, definitions, colors, etc.).
  • Swipe a finger up or down on the surface of the mouse to scroll. The area under the pointer moves the same direction as your finger.
  • Swipe left or right to go back or forward. This applies on web pages, in iPhoto and many other apps.
  • Double-tap with two fingers for Mission Control to see all your open windows at once.

Does your mouse seem to have a mind of its own, scrolling and changing views when you least expect it? Because the entire surface is touch-sensitive, it responds to every action your fingers make. It’s OK to grasp the sides of the mouse but avoid resting your fingers on the top surface. Click, drag and swipe carefully, then remove your finger.

If you must, you can use any old-style USB mouse with your Mac but you'll miss out on the multitouch features and all the advancements Apple has made in the past 10 years.

Recommended trackpad & mouse settings

Adjust your trackpad & mouse options in System Preferences. We recommend turning on all options except trackpad three-finger drag. For illustration purposes, we're showing all options together. You’ll need to click More Gestures to see them all on your Mac.

Having trouble connecting your device to work? Learn how to pair a keyboard, mouse or trackpad with your Mac.

While the Magic Trackpad is great, if you're more comfortable using a mouse, you'll benefit from some handy gestures built into Apple's Magic Mouse.

As a Mac user, you have two options when deciding how to control your computer: Using Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad. Both options provide useful gestures to make operating many of macOS's features easier.

While the Magic Trackpad is great, if you're more comfortable using a mouse, you'll benefit from some handy gestures built into Apple's Magic Mouse. Let's take a look at these gestures and how they can improve the experience on macOS through the following article.

Do you know how to navigate the Mac with these Magic Mouse mouse gestures?

  1. Activate gesture on the Magic Mouse
  2. Perform gestures with Magic Mouse
    1. 1. Use Smart Zoom
    2. 2. Open Mission Control
    3. 3. Swipe to navigate browser pages
    4. 4. Switch between full screen applications
Mouse Gestures For Mac

Activate gesture on the Magic Mouse

To use the gestures built into Magic Mouse, you first need to enable them in System Preferences . On the menu bar, navigate to Apple menu> System Preferences to open.

How

Click on Mouse in this menu to open the control panel for Magic Mouse. For the gestures below to work, you will need to enable Smart Zoom.

Next, go to the More Gestures tab and turn on all three gestures there, including Swipe between pages, Swipe between full-screen apps and Mission Control all activated .

Now that the mouse is set up, learn how to use these useful gestures in macOS.

Perform gestures with Magic Mouse

Magic Mouse gestures all work with simple movements, with one or two fingers. You can execute them directly on the mouse. The entire surface of the mouse works for these gestures.

You may feel a bit unfamiliar at first. But after trying it out, you will feel more comfortable with these movements and can use them without thinking.

1. Use Smart Zoom

How to use : Double-tap with one finger to zoom in or out on web pages, images, or PDF documents.

When you use Smart Zoom on the Magic Mouse, the Mac performs a quick zoom in on the area where the mouse pointer is. This gesture will work in most web browsers, as well as the PDFs or images you open on a Mac.

The enlargement size is about 50%. When you tap the same area again, the screen shrinks to standard. Try using Smart Zoom right on this page by enlarging a paragraph or an image.

Smart Zoom is a neat shortcut that allows you to zoom in quickly without using a Mac shortcut. Additionally, the shortcuts built into the web browser or the PDF application may vary. Smart Zoom allows you to quickly control your window view without searching for different shortcuts for each program.

2. Open Mission Control

How to use : Double-tap with two fingers to open Mission Control.

Most Mac users are familiar with Mission Control, which provides a quick view of all open windows. Apple's Magic Keyboard provides a shortcut to open Mission Control with the F3 key, but you can use a different Mac keyboard without these buttons.

Using Mission Control gestures, you can open and switch between your work windows with simple one-hand movement. Because open windows can get out of hand when you're working at a fast pace, this gesture helps you take control of your applications.

3. Swipe to navigate browser pages

How to use : Swipe left or right with one finger to switch between pages. Swiping to the left will display the previous page, and swiping to the right will display the next page.

Usually, you will go to a website with the information you are looking for on many different sites. You may also need to quickly switch between Google search results to find the location you need.

Moving the mouse over the back and forward buttons in the browser each time is a waste of time. Instead, swiping left or right on the mouse horizontally allows you to perform the same actions much more effectively.

Using this gesture helps to move between web pages without having to hover over the toolbar each time (this can distract you). This is a simple concept, but it saves a lot of movement and clicks when you're viewing a web page.

4. Switch between full screen applications

To use : Swipe left or right with two fingers to move between full screen applications.

Fullscreen mode on macOS maximizes an application so that it fills the entire screen. This is a great way to get rid of distractions, but can be hard to turn off easily.

Gestures

To make a window full screen with the mouse, you must move the cursor to the toolbar in the top left corner of the window. Click the green button to make that window full screen.

You may notice that macOS does not maximize it on other windows. Instead, it creates a separate screen space containing only the window you choose to work with.

To exit full screen mode, you must hover over the top of the window to display the toolbar, then click the green button again to return to the main screen.

Mouse Gestures For Mac Os

This can be annoying if you need any other windows while working in the full screen. But this gesture will solve that problem. Swiping left or right with two fingers will move your screen back and forth between the main window and the full screen window you have opened.

Swipe left to return to the home screen, then right when you're ready to work on the full screen window. You get the best by accessing all your applications, plus an expanded window to view without distraction, all available in one touch thanks to the Magic Mouse.

See Full List On Osxdaily.com

Using gestures on Magic Mouse is a great way to work smarter on a Mac, whether you're on a desktop or laptop computer. Magic Mouse becomes the standard when you buy a desktop Mac, so you should know these tips to get the most out of it.

If you want, you can try using three-finger drag on Mac to save time and click manipulation.

Hope you are succesful.

Mouse Gestures Windows 10

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